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Patterns of the Month: Animals

Each month we feature a new pattern from our Pattern and Source Print Database and archive them on these pages by category.

(Click on thumbnails to
see larger images)
Char Dish

Char Dish

Char Dish markSeen is a 9.25 inch dish made by Spode (1770-1833) in the early part of the 19th century. The dish was probably intended for serving potted char. The Arctic or sub-Arctic char is both a fresh water and salt water fish. It is similar to trout or salmon, and is found in very cold lakes and coastal waters.

Members only: for more information about this pattern and to see other similar patterns, search the Pattern and Source Print Database.

(Click on thumbnails to
see larger images)
Giraffe

"Giraffe"

Giraffe markShown here is a 10 inch plate in the "Giraffe" pattern made by John Ridgway (1830-1841) to commemorate the giraffes brought to the new London Zoological Gardens in 1836. The pattern is the same on the entire dinner service. It also appears on a tea service, but with a different border. "Giraffe" was a very popular pattern. It was printed in every color except yellow. Members only: for more information about this pattern and to see other similar patterns, search the Pattern and Source Print Database.

Pangolin plate

"Pangolin"

Pangolin closeupThis pattern is found on a 4.25 inch saucer. The name of the armadillo-like animal, pangolin, is printed in the foliage at the bottom of the saucer (see the Additional Image). The pangolin is similar to an armadillo and an ant eater. It has large plate-like scales, and in the past was thought to be a link between mammals and reptiles. It is a mammal. Pangolins are an endangered species as it is thought that its ground up scales are a cure for cancer or asthma. They are also considered a delicious exotic food. Their plight is similar to that of the rhinoceros which is hunted for the magical properties of its horn. See more in the Chinoiserie category. Members only: for more information about this pattern and to see other similar patterns, search the Pattern and Source Print Database.

zoological gardens plate

"Zoological Gardens"

markSeen here is an 8 inch plate from the "Zoological Gardens" series by James and Ralph Clews (1813-1834). The series commemorates the opening of the London Zoological Gardens in 1828. Each size and shape shows a different scene. Many were copied from a book for children titled "Henry and Emma's Visit To The Zoological Gardens, In Regent's Park" by James Bishop, 1830 (see the source print, pictured below). Members only: for more information about this pattern and to sesource printe other similar patterns, search the Pattern and Source Print Database.

Tiger plate

Children's patterns were often given as rewards for good behavior, christening presents and teaching tools. Children, in general, like animals, so this 5.75 inch plate with an exotic animal would have been a delightful gift. To learn more about it, see the Pattern and Source Print Database.
Reindeer pattern plate

Reindeer pattern mark"Reindeer Pattern"
The 4.5 inch plate seen here was made by the Don Pottery (1801-1839) in North Rotherham, Yorkshire. The pattern shows a woman milking a reindeer while her children play nearby. To learn more about it, see the Pattern and Source Print Database.

The Goldfinch
"The Goldfinch" by an unknown maker is printed on a 9.75 inch plate.  The pattern, circa 1820, is found on both dinner and teawares.   To learn more about it, see the Pattern and Source Print Database.
Plate
Picture"Durham Ox With John Day" by an unknown maker is found on a 21 inch by 17 inch platter.  It was copied from an engraving  by T.Whessell after a painting by T. Boultbec.   See the engraving.  The Durham Ox is actually only found on this pattern and the 10" plate and soup plate.  The rest of the series portrays rural scenes with cows and cowmen.  There are nine patterns from the Durham Ox Series listed in the pattern and source print database.  
Belmont Plate
Ornithological Series
This series was  made by Andrew Stevenson (1810-1836).  Each size and shape has a different bird or birds in the center.  This 10 inch plate depicts a peacock and turkey.  For more information about this series, see Ornithological in the pattern and source print database.
Quadrupeds platter

Quadrupeds source print"Quadrupeds"
The" Quadrupeds" dinner service is quite extensive, with a different animal in the center of each size and shape, as well as in the medallions in the border. This 6 inch plate features a mastiff in the center, with horses, sheep, a water vole (I thought this was a beaver) and a squirrel in the border medallions. For more information about this series, take a look at the pattern and source print database.

Source print: "Mastiff & Lion Dog" The engraving is by J. Tookey, after a drawing by Julius Ibbetson. The engraving is found in "The Cabinet of Quadrupeds" by John Church (c. 1803). The pottery engraver left out the lion dog!

Sporting Series or Zoological Series well and tree platter

Commonly known as either Sporting Series or Zoological Series, this 18-3/4" by 14-3/4" well and tree platter was made by Enoch Wood & Sons in Staffordshire around 1825.  Each size in this series depicts a different animal that is being hunted.  The tiger in the background on this platter appears to be hunting too!  There is no pattern name marked on any of the items. 

Domestic Cattle
Domestic Cattle mark"Domestic Cattle"
Shown on both a 9 inch plate and 13 inch comport,this view features a seated figure piping. The pattern is attributed to Careys on the basis of a piece bearing the factory mark and series name on a ribbon (FOB True Blue p. 86, Case 31/2). Cattle is the old English word for domestic animals, while today we only think of cows as cattle. For more information about the series, see"Domestic Cattle" (iv) in the pattern and source print database.
Bewick Stag
Known as "The Bewick Stag", this 9.5 inch pearlware plate is printed in underglaze blue by Minton. A General History of Quadrupeds (1790) by Thomas Bewick (1753-1828) pictures the Stag or Red Deer. He stands at the center of this earthenware dinner plate. Behind him are two smaller stags and, perhaps, a female deer. The border consists of vignettes which Bewick used on the his title pages or at the end of his descriptions of animals. Two have been identified. One is called "A Crouching Leopard Ready to Spring" c. 1792, which appears in the third edition of Quadrupeds, p. 92. The other is "Dogs Disputing", which appears in the 1826 edition of Bewick's Water Birds, p. 414. The other vignettes may also be by Bewick or by one of his apprentices. The "Crouching Leopard" vignette was used as the central pattern by other makers.
Zoological Sketches tureen

"Zoological Sketches" printed on earthenware in underglaze black by Job Meigh & Son (1815-1832). The central animal pattern and the birds in the border are different on nearly each size and shape. This soup tureen stand depicts a leopard. Other animals in the series are an elephant, a rhinoceros, an elk, a lion, a tiger, a skunk, a hyena, a zebra, a lemur, a gazelle, kangaroos, and more! The pattern was also printed in blue.

Quadrupeds

"Quadrupeds" by John Hall, printed in underglaze blue on earthenware, Staffordshire circa 1825. The central animal pattern and the animals in the border vary by size. This is a huge series filled with animals


Find additional patterns and more extensive information in our Pattern and Source Print Database.

See other Patterns of the Month by category:

 

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